Souper Bowl 2015 – Jan. 24th

Every January, our popular Souper Bowl is held the weekend prior to the NFL’s Super Bowl.  Rather than a football event, this is a soup and dessert sampling event featuring more than 40 restaurants and chefs.  In addition to featuring great food, guests enjoy live music,  a silent auction, have the ability to purchase commemorative cookbooks and much more! Attendees also participate in our People’s Choice voting and vote for their favorite soup, vegetarian soup, dessert and booth.

Restaurant winners of the 2015 event are below.  Congrats to all our winners! Thank you to everyone who made the event possible including our sponsors, restaurants, volunteers and guests!

People’s Choice Winners

  • 1st Place and Souper Bowl Champion – Ranchers Club of New Mexico for their Chimayo Red Chile Pork Chowder
  • 2nd Place – Artichoke Café for their Lobster Bisque
  • 3rd Place – Bocadillos New Mexico for their New Mexico Clam Chowder

People’s Choice Winners – Vegetarian Soup

  • 1st Place – Bouche for their Cream of New York Portabello
  • 2nd Place – Forque Kitchen and Bar at the Hyatt Regency for their Pumpkin Red Vegetarian Soup
  • 3rd Place – StreetFood Market for their Malay Curry Squash Bisque

People’s Choice Winners – Desserts

  • 1st Place – Nothing Bundt Cakes
  • 2nd Place – Theobroma Chocolatier
  • 3rd Place – Chocolate Cartel

People’s Choice Winners – Best Booth – The Ranchers Club of New Mexico

Critics’ Choice Winners – Soup

  • 1st Place – Ranchers Club of New Mexico for their Chimayo Red Chile Pork Chowder
  • 2nd Place – StreetFood Asia for their Bangkok Christmas Lobster Bisque
  • 3rd Place –  StreetFood Market for their Malay Curry Squash Bisque

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< < < 2015 PARTICIPATING RESTAURANTS > > >

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Thank You 2015 Souper Bowl Sponsors

SB Sponsors 2015- w layers3

Updated Study Reflects Rise in Hunger in New Mexico

For the second year in a row, New Mexico ranks #1 for childhood hunger.  The 2014 release of Map the Meal Gap shows the childhood hunger rate in New Mexico is 29.2% with one in three children growing up hungry. The report shows that more than 150,000 New Mexico children are at risk of hunger.

Melody Wattenbarger, president and CEO of Roadrunner Food Bank said, “This should be a wakeup call for everyone in our state. Until we make sure that our children aren’t going to school hungry, we won’t be able to solve any of the other problems we have. If you look at indicators like our children’s abysmal test scores, health, graduation rates and future wages, childhood hunger underpins them all. Agencies like ours can’t address this issue alone. It’s a statewide problem.  It needs a statewide response.”

Over the past four years, Roadrunner Food Bank’s national organization, Feeding America, has released the annual study to measure hunger and the gap of meals by state and county.

New Mexico is fourth in overall hunger among states, tied with Alabama and North Carolina. 18.6% of people in New Mexico are at risk of experiencing hunger in New Mexico overall.   Nationwide, the hunger rate is 15.9%.

The annual Map the Meal Gap report also estimates the meal gap by state and county and the food budget shortfall for low-income households.  In 2014, the report showed New Mexico’s meal gap is 67,795,200 translating into a food budget shortfall of $175,675,500.  The average cost per meal in New Mexico is $2.59 according to the report.

The top five New Mexico counties with the highest rates of hunger overall and for children are below.  Luna County ranked as the hungriest county in New Mexico for both children and the overall population:

Children

Luna – 39.7%

Taos – 32.6%

Cibola – 32.4%

McKinley – 32.2%

Overall Population

Luna – 22.9%

McKinley – 22.2%

Cibola – 18.3%

Sierra – 18%

Roosevelt and San Juan – 17.7%

To Map the Meal Gap in any New Mexico County, visit www.feedingamerica.org/mapthegap.

Food Rescue – Keeping Food Out of Landfills

Many of us feel terribly guilty when we have to throw food away, and Americans toss a lot of food annually. The Environmental Protection Agency reported that in 2010 Americans threw away about 33 million tons of food.

But at Roadrunner Food Bank, we and our food industry partners have been rescuing food in Albuquerque and New Mexico for more than 30 years. What does that mean, food rescue? Food rescue is defined as, “the practice of safely retrieving edible food that would otherwise go to waste, and distributing it to those in need. The recovered food is edible, but often not saleable. Products that are past their sell by dates or are imperfect in any way are able to be donated by food industry donors.”

Roadrunner Food Bank’s Food Rescue program picks up unprepared foods weekly at 100 different locations. Food that is picked up as part of the Food Rescue Program includes items such as bakery items, meat, dairy, produce, canned goods and dry goods.

And volunteers are key to executing a successful food rescue program. Once the food arrives at the Food Bank, volunteers sort, label, box or repack food items allowing us to more quickly process and distribute food to partner agencies and through our direct service programs.

Last year, we rescued 19.7 million pounds of food.    We kept it out of landfills and placed it in the hands of the nearly 40,000 people we help every week.

Recently Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and the USDA will begin placing an emphasis on food rescue and encouraging Americans to participate.

Learn more about our Food Rescue Program here and see the top food industry donors participating in our Food Rescue Program.

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