Holiday Food & Fund Drive 2014

This holiday season your support makes a difference for hungry families throughout New Mexico.  Take part by hosting a food drive, creating a fundraising team through our Online Food Drive, giving or volunteering.  Helping makes a tremendous difference by generating awareness about hunger in our state and community!

How to get involved?

  • Make a gift to the Food Bank.
  • Start a team and raise funds through our Online Food Drive. You create your own fundraising page and send invitations inviting others to give through email to friends, family and co-workers.
  • View our Holiday Calendar of Events for a list of many ways get involved.
  • Volunteer! Sign up for a volunteer shift –  CLICK HERE TO VOLUNTEER
  • Donate non-perishable food. Leave a bag near your mailbox on Sat., Nov. 22 during the Letter Carriers’ Food Drive. Your letter carrier will pick it up for the Food Bank.
  • You can also bring food donations to ANY Smith’s Food and Drug Store.
  • Read and share our newsletter, and sign up to receive email from us HERE.
  • Click the hyperlink for more information about our Holiday Food & Fund Drive.

THANK YOU TO OUR 2014 HOLIDAY FOOD AND FUND SPONSORSHFD Sponsors

Thanksgiving for All

In the spirit of giving thanks, we want to thank you for the gifts you’ve sent to help our hungry neighbors. Your generosity has touched their lives in a very meaningful way and given them the opportunity to build a better life for themselves and their families.

While many people look forward to sharing a Thanksgiving meal with family and friends, for those who are hungry Thanksgiving is just another day of struggling to feed their families.

Julio is a six-year-old child who worries about not having enough to eat. His mother died about a year ago, and he lives with his father, Ernesto, and his younger sister. Even though Ernesto works, money is very limited and there is often no food in the house.

“One day at school, I was teaching the class about Thanksgiving,” Julio’s teacher said. “Julio looked so sad, I thought he was going to cry. After class, I asked him what was wrong and he said, ‘No Thanksgiving for us. We don’t have any food.’”

Julio’s teacher told Ernesto about a partner food pantry near the family’s house. They gave Ernesto’s family a box of food and said he could come back for groceries to prepare a Thanksgiving dinner.

“I just couldn’t believe my eyes when I saw all the food we received,” Ernesto said. “I am so grateful, I hardly know what to say. Thank you to all the kind people who are helping us. This good food for my children is truly a gift like no other.”

To give, visit www.rrfb.org/thanks. Thank you for giving and making this truly a Thanksgiving for All.

Souper Bowl 2015 – Jan. 24th

Every January, our popular Souper Bowl is held the weekend prior to the NFL’s Super Bowl.  Rather than a football event, this is a soup and dessert sampling event featuring more than 40 restaurants and chefs.  In addition to featuring great food, guests enjoy live music,  a silent auction, have the ability to purchase commemorative cookbooks and much more! Attendees also participate in our People’s Choice voting and vote for their favorite soup, vegetarian soup, dessert and booth.

The 2015 event will take place on Sat., Jan 24 at the Food Bank’s Albuquerque Branch.  Souper Bowl hours are from 11 am to 2 pm.  Tickets are $40 for adults and $10 for children.

To buy early-bird tickets:

  • Purchase tickets online by clicking here.
  • Call 505.349.8921.  Tickets can purchased over the phone and will be mailed to the ticket buyer.  A one-time $2.00 handling fee will be added to phone purchases.

Online ticket sales end on Wednesday, January 21st, 2015.  Any tickets purchased after Sunday, January 18 will be held at Will Call. Tickets prices the day of the event are $45 at the door.

The 2014 Souper Bowl was named as the Weekly Alibi’s Best of Burque in the category of charity events.

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< << PURCHASE 2015 SOUPER BOWL TICKETS HERE > > >

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< < < 2014 PARTICIPATING RESTAURANTS > > >

< < < VIEW THE 2014 SILENT AUCTION ITEMS > > >

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Thank You 2014 Souper Bowl Sponsors

SB Sponsor Logos 2 - website

Updated Study Reflects Rise in Hunger in New Mexico

For the second year in a row, New Mexico ranks #1 for childhood hunger.  The 2014 release of Map the Meal Gap shows the childhood hunger rate in New Mexico is 29.2% with one in three children growing up hungry. The report shows that more than 150,000 New Mexico children are at risk of hunger.

Melody Wattenbarger, president and CEO of Roadrunner Food Bank said, “This should be a wakeup call for everyone in our state. Until we make sure that our children aren’t going to school hungry, we won’t be able to solve any of the other problems we have. If you look at indicators like our children’s abysmal test scores, health, graduation rates and future wages, childhood hunger underpins them all. Agencies like ours can’t address this issue alone. It’s a statewide problem.  It needs a statewide response.”

Over the past four years, Roadrunner Food Bank’s national organization, Feeding America, has released the annual study to measure hunger and the gap of meals by state and county.

New Mexico is fourth in overall hunger among states, tied with Alabama and North Carolina. 18.6% of people in New Mexico are at risk of experiencing hunger in New Mexico overall.   Nationwide, the hunger rate is 15.9%.

The annual Map the Meal Gap report also estimates the meal gap by state and county and the food budget shortfall for low-income households.  In 2014, the report showed New Mexico’s meal gap is 67,795,200 translating into a food budget shortfall of $175,675,500.  The average cost per meal in New Mexico is $2.59 according to the report.

The top five New Mexico counties with the highest rates of hunger overall and for children are below.  Luna County ranked as the hungriest county in New Mexico for both children and the overall population:

Children

Luna – 39.7%

Taos – 32.6%

Cibola – 32.4%

McKinley – 32.2%

Overall Population

Luna – 22.9%

McKinley – 22.2%

Cibola – 18.3%

Sierra – 18%

Roosevelt and San Juan – 17.7%

To Map the Meal Gap in any New Mexico County, visit www.feedingamerica.org/mapthegap.

Grocery Shop and Give to New Mexicans in Need

When you shop at Smith’s Food and Drug Stores, they will donate to the Food Bank every time you swipe your Rewards Card!

Simply sign up for a free Smith’s Rewards Card online or at your neighborhood Smith’s store and you’ll save when you shop, earn points toward fuel purchases and get money-saving coupons.

Plus, Smith’s will donate money to your favorite local nonprofit organization each time you use your card.  You can go online to select Roadrunner Food Bank as your charity of choice.  Then, all of your Smith’s grocery purchases will help feed hungry families in our community.

There is no cost to enroll in the Community Rewards Program, and enrollment will not affect your fuel points or coupon discounts.

To designate Roadrunner Food Bank as your Rewards’ recipient, visit http://www.rrfb.org/smiths

Food Rescue – Keeping Food Out of Landfills

Many of us feel terribly guilty when we have to throw food away, and Americans toss a lot of food annually. The Environmental Protection Agency reported that in 2010 Americans threw away about 33 million tons of food.

But at Roadrunner Food Bank, we and our food industry partners have been rescuing food in Albuquerque and New Mexico for more than 30 years. What does that mean, food rescue? Food rescue is defined as, “the practice of safely retrieving edible food that would otherwise go to waste, and distributing it to those in need. The recovered food is edible, but often not saleable. Products that are past their sell by dates or are imperfect in any way are able to be donated by food industry donors.”

Roadrunner Food Bank’s Food Rescue program picks up unprepared foods weekly at 100 different locations. Food that is picked up as part of the Food Rescue Program includes items such as bakery items, meat, dairy, produce, canned goods and dry goods.

And volunteers are key to executing a successful food rescue program. Once the food arrives at the Food Bank, volunteers sort, label, box or repack food items allowing us to more quickly process and distribute food to partner agencies and through our direct service programs.

Last year, we rescued 19.7 million pounds of food.    We kept it out of landfills and placed it in the hands of the nearly 40,000 people we help every week.

Recently Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and the USDA will begin placing an emphasis on food rescue and encouraging Americans to participate.

Learn more about our Food Rescue Program here and see the top food industry donors participating in our Food Rescue Program.

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